Addiction Is a Tough Opponent, Tyson Tells Drug Court Grads

, New Jersey Law Journal


Graduates of Essex County, N.J.'s Drug Court program get a hard-hitting message of support from a surprise guest speaker: boxing hall of famer Mike Tyson.

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What's being said

  • steve castleman

    Addiction is a chronic, progressive brain disease. It's treatable. Perhaps not as successfully as one might like, but on a par with other chronic diseases that require substantial behavioral change, like diabetes and hypertension.

    Unfortunately, many people still don't believe addiction is a disease. That's why science-based education is so important.

    For a not-for-profit website that discusses the science of substance use and abuse in accessible English (how alcohol and drugs work in the brain; how addiction develops; why addiction is a chronic, progressive brain disease; what parts of the brain malfunction as a result of substance abuse; how that malfunction skews decision-making and motivation, resulting in addict behaviors; why some get addicted while others don't; how treatment works; how well treatment works; why relapse is common; what family and friends can do; etc.) please click on

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