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Hayes Hunt and Arthur P. Fritzinger

Reporting and Investigating Potential Employee Wrongdoing

By Hayes Hunt and Arthur P. Fritzinger |

Companies in every industry—private and public—struggle with the difficult task of promptly identifying employee wrongdoing and responding appropriately. The National Football League continues to be embroiled in a controversy arising from its reaction to the off-the-field conduct of its players. Penn State University continues to make attempts to repair its reputation after the Jerry Sandusky scandal. Lloyds Banking Group recently dismissed eight employees and sought to recoup millions in bonuses after it was revealed that they, along with employees of at least two other British banks, had attempted to manipulate benchmark interest rates from 2006 to 2009. Even government organizations struggle with this issue: Last month, Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Joseph C. Waters Jr. resigned amid an investigation by the FBI that has lasted more than a year.

business man with pen drawing graphics on world map

Recognition Comes Before Enforcement With Foreign Judgments

By Paige H. Forster |

General counsel know what it's like to be on the receiving end of a complaint and to guide litigation through the trial court and the appeal. Perhaps less familiar is being on the receiving end of an opponent's efforts to enforce a judgment rendered outside the United States.

When Information Governance and Data Privacy Collide

By Laura Kibbe and Tara Lawler |

The so-called "Big Data" problem has caused many organizations to breathe new life into their record-retention programs. A whole new discipline—information governance—has emerged as a framework to govern the creation, use, retention and disposition of information, as well as the technical platforms on which the information resides. While storage may still be cheap, with the ever-increasing data volumes, even traditional infrastructure organization is being challenged. As a result, more multinational corporations are moving to the cloud as a cost-savings mechanism for everything from email to database storage and document creation, such as Google Docs. In addition, while corporate IT may have been driven by a goal to decentralize over the past several years, the current trend toward centralization of company information to achieve cost savings carries the day today. This all sounds like a great first step in an organization's attempt to get its hand around its own Big Data issues. But what happens when what makes the most business sense might actually be putting the company at risk?

Close up of a Smartphone Camera

Preventing the Leak of Embarrassing Information Online

By Hayes Hunt and Jillian R. Thornton |

You are general counsel to a company, and your CEO steps into your office, clutching his iPhone in one hand and wiping sweat from his brow with the other, and tells you that a compromising photograph of him was stolen from his phone and posted online. You start thinking not if, but when, shareholders will discover this embarrassment, how much it will cost the company and what legal action to take.