Philadelphia / Eastern PA

First Risperdal Trial in Philadelphia Begins

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Opening arguments in the first trial of Philadelphia's Risperdal mass-tort actions began Jan. 23 with attorneys squaring off over whether the drug's maker failed to warn patients about the risk of male breast growth associated with taking the medication.

City Hall in Philadelphia

Ex-Phila. Judge Waters Gets Two Years for Case-Fixing

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Former Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Joseph C. Waters Jr. has been sentenced to 24 months in prison for corruption charges stemming from fixing cases for campaign donors.

PPA Ordered to Pay Attorney Fees in Disabled Access Suit

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

The Philadelphia Parking Authority will have to pay over $100,000 to cover the cost of the legal representation for persons who sued a division of the PPA over the number of taxicabs that are inaccessible to people in wheelchairs, under a federal magistrate judge's order.

Transgender Woman Challenges Constitutionality of ADA Exclusion

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

In the summer of 1989, U.S. senators debating the Americans with Disabilities Act excluded behavior they deemed immoral from the ADA's protections, including "transvestism, transsexualism, pedophilia, exhibitionism, voyeurism, gender identity disorders not resulting from physical impairments, or other sexual behavior disorders," according to the text of the law.

Judge Approves $35.5M Babies R Us Antitrust Accord, Again

By Gina Passarella |

A $35.5 million class-action settlement in an antitrust case against Babies R Us has received final approval—for the second time.

 Philadelphia

Xarelto Mass Tort Established in Philadelphia

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Litigation surrounding Xarelto, a blood thinner that is alleged by plaintiffs to cause uncontrollable and sometimes fatal bleeding, has been organized into a mass tort in Philadelphia.

gavel

Phila. Defender Association Sole Entrant in New Conflict-Counsel Bid

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Since late 2012, the Nutter administration has been trying to establish an organization to represent indigent defendants when the Public Defender's Office has a conflict. Now the only candidate for the contract is the defender's office itself.

Shredded paper series - confidential

Gay Lawyer Suing Firms Seeks Confidential Settlement Info

By Max Mitchell |

A gay attorney suing personal injury firms for alleged discrimination is pointing to a confidential settlement to help establish the value of lost compensation he claims to have sustained because of the firms' allegedly scuttling his lateral move.

Lawyer Denied Fees From Ex-Client's Settlement

By Lizzy McLellan |

The Commonwealth Court has ruled that a workers' compensation claimant's former attorney should not be awarded fees for a settlement reached after the claimant discharged that attorney.

verdicts and settlements

Driver Settles With Deliveryman After Intersection Crash

On June 2, 2013, plaintiff Mahmoud Ahmad, 25, a pizza deliveryman, was driving an Acura TL sedan on Lycoming Street toward the intersection with K Street, in Northeast Philadelphia.On June 2, 2013, plaintiff Mahmoud Ahmad, 25, a pizza deliveryman, was driving an Acura TL sedan on Lycoming Street toward the intersection with K Street, in Northeast Philadelphia. Ahmad claimed that he stopped at a four-way stop sign, then drove into the intersection. As he did so, the driver's side of his car was struck by a Nissan Maxima driven by Mohammed Abuawada, who was traveling on K Street. Ahmad maintained that Abuawada struck his car at 80 to 85 mph. Ahmad suffered a fracture to his left clavicle, which he claimed was a serious impairment of a bodily function.

gavel

New Montco Bar Association Leader Stresses Lawyer Involvement

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The incoming president of the Montgomery Bar Association said increasing involvement of the organization's new members will be one of his top areas of focus.

Cynthia Baldwin

Judge OKs Former GC's Role in Penn State Case

By Max Mitchell |

A Dauphin County judge has denied the bid by three former Penn State administrators charged with covering up the crimes of convicted child molester Jerry Sandusky to have the cases against them dropped.

Senate Judiciary Committee Confirmation Hearnigs for Samuel Alito. Credit: Roberto Westbrook. 1/11/06.

Alito, Accepting Becker Award, Lauds Third Circuit Icon

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

A federal appellate judge with chambers at Sixth and Market could exist in isolation—driving into the parking garage and taking the judges-only elevator up to the top floors of the courthouse where he could read briefs and write his opinions, stopping to take lunch in the judges-only lunch room a few floors below, "where the food was really lousy," said U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito Jr.

Marshall Dennehey Hires Post & Schell Appellate Lawyer

By Gina Passarella |

Longtime Post & Schell appellate attorney Teresa Ficken Sachs has joined Marshall Dennehey Warner Coleman & Goggin as vice chairwoman of the firm's appellate practice.

Case Weighing ADA Protections Against Workplace Violence Survives

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

A federal judge in Philadelphia has decided to develop the record in a case that, according to the judge, "tests the outer bounds of the Americans with Disabilities Act in the context of workplace violence."

Traffic Court

Ex-Traffic Court Judge Lowry Gets 20 Months in Prison

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Former Philadelphia Traffic Court Judge Michael Lowry has been sentenced to 20 months in prison for lying to the grand jury in the ticket-fixing case.

Defense Trying to Execute Accord in Judge's Fatal Fall Case

By Gina Passarella |

The estate of former Pennsylvania Superior Court Judge Robert C. Daniels, who died after a fall during a party at Berger & Montague shareholder Sherrie Savett's home in 2011, has settled with Savett and others, but the defense has not been able to execute judgment.

Jon A. Baughman, Former Chairman of Pepper Hamilton, Dies

Jon A. Baughman, a trial lawyer who served as chairman of Pepper Hamilton's executive committee from 1992-94, died Monday following a long illness.

Ex-Fox 29 Anchor's Racial Slur Case Moves Toward Trial

By Max Mitchell |

A former Fox 29 anchor who was fired after using a racial epithet will not have to wait for his former employer's interlocutory appeal before his employment discrimination suit can go to trial, a federal judge has ruled.

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ACLU, Phila. City Paper Challenge Law Aimed at Felons' Speech

By Max Mitchell |

The Pennsylvania ACLU and several media outlets, including the Philadelphia City Paper, are challenging a state law they claim is aimed at silencing convicted felons and those who publish the words of felons.

handshake

Choice of Smyler as GC Seen as 'Visionary'

By Gina Passarella |

While a small-firm lawyer from Philadelphia was not what many may have expected in Gov.-elect Tom Wolf's selection of his general counsel, those who know Denise Smyler say she is the perfect person for the job both for her temperament and her legal and political acumen.

Office of Open Records Head to Join Pepper Hamilton

By Gina Passarella |

Terry Mutchler, the first executive director of Pennsylvania's Office of Open Records, will be leaving the office to head up a new practice within Pepper Hamilton's media and communications group.

Defendant Seeks $177K From Hagens Berman in Thalidomide Cases

By Gina Passarella |

One of the defendants in a cluster of thalidomide lawsuits in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania is seeking nearly $177,000 in fees as a sanction against the plaintiffs' counsel, Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro.

verdicts and settlements

Plaintiff's Leg Was Fractured in Multi-Vehicle Collision

On Oct. 1, 2010, plaintiff Shawn Garnett, 19, a retail employee, was a passenger in a 2003 Ford Explorer traveling on New Falls Road in Middletown Township. The driver, Meagan Peterson, lost control, crossed the center line, and struck two other vehicles head-on. Garnett, who was in the rear seat behind the driver, claimed he suffered a fractured left femur.

Plaintiffs Get Second Chance With Expert in Zoloft MDL

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

Hundreds of people who sued Pfizer alleging birth defects from its antidepressant Zoloft will be allowed to present another expert after the first one they offered to the court was tossed last summer.

Duquesne University General Counsel Set to Retire in June

By Gina Passarella |

Duquesne University's longtime general counsel, Linda S. Drago, has announced she will retire at the end of the academic year.

After 40 Years, Man Claiming Wrongful Conviction Freed

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A Philadelphia judge has ordered the immediate release on parole of a man who has served more than 40 years of a life sentence, which he claimed was the result of prosecutorial misconduct and false testimony.

With Ferman Leaving, Castor Eyes Return as Montco DA

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman has announced she will be running for one of the county's open judicial slots, forgoing the chance to run for a third term as head prosecutor.

Pepper Hamilton

Pepper Hamilton Can't Be Sued for Using Public Documents

By Gina Passarella |

Even if Pepper Hamilton violated a former client's confidentiality by disclosing an FBI affidavit of probable cause to search that client's home, the firm can't be sued considering the affidavit was made public prior to the firm's disclosure, a Philadelphia trial judge has ruled.

verdicts and settlements

Plaintiff Said Staff Failed to Monitor Infirm Patient

According to the pretrial memorandum of plaintiff Eunice Rogers, on June 2, 2012, the plaintiff's mother, Mildred D. Rogers, who was 83 at the time, was admitted to St. Joseph's Hospital, of the North Philadelphia Health System, for treatment of aspiration pneumonia.

Robbery Not a Normal Work Condition of Liquor Store

By Max Mitchell |

In light of the state Supreme Court's 2013 ruling that a police officer's PTSD stemming from a fatal car collision was a compensable injury, the Commonwealth Court has changed its position on whether an armed robbery at a liquor store constitutes a normal working condition for workers' compensation purposes.

Justice Ronald Castille

After 21 Years on Supreme Court Bench, Castille Retires

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

When he arrived at a naval hospital in Philadelphia after being wounded in Vietnam, the City of Brotherly Love was the last place Ronald D. Castille wanted to be.

State and Federal Law Privilege Psych Evaluations

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

Psychological evaluations for a student who allegedly touched the genitals of another student in their special-needs class are privileged under a combination of state and federal laws, a federal judge has ruled.

picture of man hands signing contract

Judge Explains $6.9M Award in Heated Nonsolicitation Case

By Gina Passarella |

Nearly a year-and-a-half after awarding the plaintiff in a nonsolicitation case $6.9 million in compensatory and punitive damages, the Chester County judge overseeing the matter authored an opinion in support of the award, detailing in sharp terms the defendants' alleged misconduct.

pa map

'Kids-for-Cash' Facility Dispute Sent to Pa.

By Max Mitchell |

A New Jersey district court judge has transferred to Pennsylvania federal court a dispute between the co-owners of the juvenile detention facilities at the heart of the "kids-for-cash" scandal.

Justices OK Rules Aimed at Protecting Client Funds

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court approved additions to the Rules of Professional Conduct aimed at deterring theft by lawyers of their clients' money and reducing potential conflicts of interest.

Nonprofit Group Home Operator Denied Tax Exemption

By Max Mitchell |

The Commonwealth Court has determined that a nonprofit that operates about 80 group homes in western Pennsylvania should not have been awarded tax-exempt status as a "purely public charity."

Fracking, Penn State Topped Commonwealth Court Agenda

By Lizzy McLellan |

The Commonwealth Court in 2014 took on several issues of national importance.

handshake over coffee

Mergers, Management Changes Drew BigLaw Focus in 2014

By Gina Passarella |

The latter part of 2014 brought with it not only the biggest business of law news for Pennsylvania, but perhaps for the country. All eyes watched during the second half of the year as Morgan, Lewis & Bockius entertained merger discussions with struggling Boston-based firm Bingham McCutchen. A full-on acquisition of the more than 700 lawyers at Bingham would have been a big departure for Morgan Lewis' typical growth strategy of acquiring groups of attorneys from firms that are disbanding.

gevel in a courtroom

Commonwealth Court Sets Boundaries on Civil Forfeiture

By Lizzy McLellan |

The Commonwealth Court has made more stringent the prerequisites for civil forfeiture in a ruling to remand the forfeiture case of a Philadelphia woman's home and vehicle.

gavel and book

Counsel Fees Aren't Loss Under Trade Law, Justices Rule

By Max Mitchell |

Attorney fees alone won't be enough to toll the "ascertainable loss" requirement under Pennsylvania's Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law, the state Supreme Court has ruled

Harrisburg Capitol Building

Suit Brought Over Corbett's Healthy PA Plan

By John L. Kennedy |

Just after the Obama administration gave final approval to the Corbett administration's health care plan, Healthy PA, Philadelphia-based Community Legal Services filed suit to stop the plan. The group says Healthy PA puts the health care of low-income Pennsylvanians at risk.

Football

Objecting Former NFL Players Denied Appeal

By Lizzy McLellan |

Seven dissident ex-pro football players have been denied permission to appeal U.S. District Judge Anita Brody of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania's conditional certification, for the purpose of facilitating settlement, of class plaintiffs in the NFL concussion lawsuit.

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En Banc Superior Court Tosses $14.5M Asbestos Verdict

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

After hearing reargument over whether a jury that awarded a $14.5 million asbestos verdict had been told to award a specific number for noneconomic damages in the case, an en banc Superior Court panel threw out the verdict.

City Hall in Philadelphia

Scandals Involving Judges, Staff Darkened FJD's Year

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The First Judicial District in 2014 saw several of its judges and staff targeted for alleged misconduct, from fixing cases to stealing court funds.

Rohm and Haas Brain Cancer Cases Settle

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Dow Chemical subsidiary Rohm and Haas and the plaintiffs in 33 brain-cancer-cluster cases originating out of Illinois have reached a settlement.

merger

Midsized Firms Saw Splits and Out-of-State Entries to Market

By Max Mitchell |

The passing year began with a flurry of changes for small and midsized firms across the state, with leadership transitions, group laterals, additions and splits continuing throughout the year.

scales of justice

Justices Deny Multiple-Trigger Theory for Non-Asbestos Liability

By Lizzy McLellan |

The state Supreme Court has placed a limit on the multiple-trigger theory of liability insurance coverage through a recent decision on the liability of a plumbing company's insurer.

Property Tax

Appellate Court Unable to Review City's 'Strong-Arm' Tactics

By Lizzy McLellan |

In a Philadelphia tax assessment case, the Commonwealth Court has said the city's tax collection tactics may need review, but it was unable to review them because the defendant waived his right to appeal.

verdicts and settlements

Seller's Failed Repairs Warrant Payment For Homeowner

A Chester County judge has awarded nearly $7,000 to a homeowner who brought claims against the previous owner after encountering various flaws in the home.

verdicts and settlements

Apartments To Pay For Resident's Icy Fall

A resident of a Philadelphia apartment complex has been awarded damages in a slip-and-fall case.

Email Report Finds Justices, OAG Did Not Discuss Cases

By P.J. D'Annunzio and Max Mitchell |

A review of roughly 4,000 emails sent between members of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court and the Office of the Attorney General has revealed that no improper communications between members of the two bodies took place, according to a report released by the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts on Dec. 19.

Justice Ronald Castille

Castille Rebukes Judge as Killer's Death Sentence Is Reinstated

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

After eluding execution on his fourth capital appeal, a convicted murderer has been put back on death row by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, prompting its chief justice to issue criticism of the Philadelphia judge who reversed the death sentence.

gavel

Cozen O'Connor Can Forgive Rep. Brady's Legal Fees

By Gina Passarella |

The legal expenses racked up in fighting a 2007 mayoral ballot challenge were not incurred to influence the outcome of an election, so forgiving that debt is not bound by campaign finance limits, the state Supreme Court has ruled.

Phila. DA Charges Two More Officials in Revived Probe

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Philadelphia District Attorney R. Seth Williams announced charges against two state representatives from Philadelphia implicated in the corruption probe that state Attorney General Kathleen Kane had called "non-prosecutable."

Traffic Court

Ex-Traffic Court Official Sentenced to Two Years in Prison

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The former director of records at the Philadelphia Traffic Court, William "Billy" Hird, has been sentenced to two years in prison for his part in the court's ticket-fixing scandal.

Federal Judge Rules Attorney-Client Privilege Follows Merger

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

The attorney-client privilege covering communications made in anticipation of a business merger belong to the company that resulted from the merger, not the executives of the company that was swallowed, a federal judge in Philadelphia has ruled.

After Another Poor Performance, JCB Needs Serious Reform

By hank grezlak |

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court's civil war—and our immediate legal crisis—came to an end when former Justice Seamus McCaffery decided to retire, but the lingering questions about the competency of the Judicial Conduct Board remain.

gavel

Pa. Justices to Revisit Long-Running Defamation Case

By Lizzy McLellan |

In a 12-year-old defamation case that has twice been remanded to trial court, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is set to consider whether the latest Superior Court ruling granting a third trial complies with the First Amendment.

$50M Comcast Settlement Gets Preliminary Approval

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

The $50 million agreement proposed in October to settle a decade-old case brought by Comcast subscribers who alleged the company had monopolized the local cable market has gotten preliminary approval from the federal judge handling the case.

Family Doc Can't Testify to Need for Specialized Surgery

By Gina Passarella |

A Philadelphia judge has ruled a plaintiff's primary care physician cannot be qualified to testify as an expert on laser spine surgery.

Former Pa. Attorney Resigns Over Stalking, Child Porn Convictions

By Max Mitchell |

A former Blue Bell, Pa., attorney, suspended since 2009 over criminal convictions stemming from incidents involving stalking and child pornography, has resigned from practicing law.

Unlikely Path to Big Law for Blind Melon Guitarist

By Ben Seal |

It's a Friday afternoon in November and Rogers Stevens is in the wrong city. A few hours ago he was in Ballard Spahr's Philadelphia office on Market Street and all was well, but now he's in a car at the airport, rushing to change out of his suit because he's got a plane to catch and a show to play and that show is in Calgary. He's not even in the right country.

Wrongful-Death Suit Against SugarHouse Casino Clears Hurdle

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The son of a man who collapsed at SugarHouse Casino in Philadelphia and died shortly thereafter can proceed with his wrongful-death suit but the judge in the case dismissed most of the plaintiff's negligence claims.

$4.75M Accord Reached in Apartment Fire Class Action

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The parties in a class action composed of tenants whose possessions were destroyed during an apartment building fire and subsequent demolition have reached a $4.75 million settlement, attorneys in the case have said, pending approval from the court.

Women Still Less Than One-Third Of Lawyers at Pa.'s Largest Firms

By Gina Passarella |

In the last 10 years, there has been no movement in the percentage of women lawyers practicing in the Pennsylvania offices of the state's 100 largest law firms.

Phila. Judge Lerner Receives Bar's Brennan Award

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Benjamin Lerner of the court's Criminal Division is the newest recipient of the Philadelphia Bar Association's Justice William J. Brennan Jr. Distinguished Jurist Award.

New Bar Chancellor Dandridge To Focus on Community Service

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Incoming Philadelphia Bar Association Chancellor Albert S. Dandridge III said getting lawyers more involved with helping the poor and veterans, as well as promoting diversity, will be top priorities during his tenure.

 Philadelphia

Phila.'s Longtime Chief Public Defender Retiring

By Max Mitchell |

Ellen Greenlee, who has been the chief defender at the Defender Association of Philadelphia for the past 25 years, has announced she will be stepping down this spring.

Porn Records Statutes Challenged in Third Circuit

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

Modern sexual habits—such as sexting, for example—may cause a constitutional problem for broad federal statutes aimed at stopping child pornography, but the group of professional pornography producers who are challenging the laws might not be the right plaintiffs to prove that problem.

penn state

Consent Decree Still at Issue in $60M PSU Sanction Case

By Max Mitchell |

The Commonwealth Court has ruled that the validity of the consent decree between the NCAA and Penn State that included a $60 million sanction against the university will remain on the table in the dispute over where the money will eventually end up.

Dodd-Frank Retaliation Claims Not Exempt From Arbitration

By Gina Passarella |

The anti-arbitration theme for whistleblower retaliation cases that runs through the Dodd-Frank Act does not in fact apply to a Dodd-Frank cause of action, the Third Circuit has ruled.

Fog of War Lifts to Reveal Military Supply Fraud

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

Overseas contractors pleaded guilty Monday to defrauding the U.S. government of millions of dollars in a multibillion-dollar contract to supply food and water to U.S. soldiers fighting in Afghanistan.

Hospital, Doc Not Liable Over Brain Tumor Follow-Up

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A doctor and hospital sued for medical malpractice were not at fault for allegedly failing to properly follow up on the discovery of brain tumors that led to a woman's death from metastatic melanoma, the state Superior Court has ruled.

verdicts and settlements

Latest Accord Brings Total to $5.7 Million In Bus Collision

By Max Mitchell |

More than a dozen people who were passengers on a bus that had a portion sheared off following a collision with a utility pole have settled their claims against multiple defendants for $4.3 million.

Traffic Court

Tynes Sentenced to Two Years for Perjury

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

Retired Philadelphia Traffic Court Judge Thomasine Tynes will serve two years in federal prison for perjury in front of the grand jury that was investigating ticket-fixing in her court, under a sentence handed down by a federal judge Thursday.

Berry

Ex-Judge Berry Nixes Plea Deal

By Max Mitchell |

Retired Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Willis W. Berry Jr. has decided not to take a plea deal regarding the theft and conflict of interest charges he faces for allegedly using his judicial positions and public money to help run his personal real-estate business.

Judge Greenlights 'Product-Hopping' Claims in Suboxone Litigation

By Gina Passarella |

A federal judge has allowed to survive several of the claims in an antitrust suit against the maker of opioid dependency drug Suboxone over allegations the company engaged in a "product-hopping" scheme.

Traffic Court

Traffic Court Judge Gets 18 Months

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

Former Philadelphia Traffic Court Judge Robert Mulgrew will serve 18 months in prison for perjury in front of the grand jury that was investigating ticket-fixing in his court, under a sentence delivered Wednesday by a federal judge.

State Bound to Defunct Charter School's IDEA Settlement

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

The state is responsible for carrying out the terms of a settlement made between a disabled student and the now-defunct charter school that had signed the agreement, a federal judge has ruled in an apparent case of first impression.

SEPTA Loses Round Over Ad Linking Hitler, Islam

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

A caustic advertising campaign that has won the right to publish on public transportation in New York and D.C. is looking to come to Philadelphia. And the American Freedom Defense Initiative, the organization run by two bloggers who are critical of Islam, has won a round against SEPTA in federal court in Philadelphia.

Duquesne Responds to Law Professor's Bias Suit

By Gina Passarella |

Duquesne University School of Law and its dean alleged in a response to a discrimination suit by one of its law professors that it wasn't her age, gender or teaching a course in Islamic law that caused her to be denied tenure but her "consistently poor teaching record."

Magistrate Judge Arnold C. Rapoport Dies

Former U.S. Magistrate Judge Arnold C. Rapoport of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania died Nov. 29 at age 83.

City Can't Seek Offset From Injured Cop's Settlement

By Max Mitchell |

In clarifying a 2011 state Supreme Court decision, the Commonwealth Court has ruled that the city of Philadelphia will not be able to recoup funds from a third-party settlement reached by a police officer who received Heart and Lung Act benefits after his cruiser was rear-ended by a drunk driver.

verdicts and settlements

U-Haul Settles With Deceased Employee's Family

By Lizzy McLellan |

A negligence case that brought a matter of first impression to a federal judge recently settled in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas.

Morgan Lewis Sued by Newspapers' Parent Co. Over Fees

By Gina Passarella |

The parent company of Philadelphia's two major daily newspapers has sued Morgan, Lewis & Bockius over the firm's alleged "disloyalty" in siding with one faction of two feuding ownership groups while the firm was supposed to be acting more neutrally as counsel for the parent entity.

Pharmacies Not Subject to Medical Records Act

By Max Mitchell |

Pharmacies have not been overcharging attorneys for medical records, the state Supreme Court has ruled.

City Hall in Philadelphia

Attorney Charged With Sexual Assault of 14-Year-Old

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A Philadelphia lawyer has been accused of sexually assaulting a 14-year-old girl who was forced into prostitution by a Germantown couple, according to Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams.

Judge Rizzo, Head of Foreclosure Program, Leaving the Bench

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

After 16 years on the bench, Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Annette M. Rizzo is set to leave the court to work in alternative dispute resolution.

operating room

Panel Throws Out $19.5M Med Mal Verdict

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The state Superior Court has reversed a $19.5 million verdict awarded to the husband of a woman who died from complications related to polyp-removal surgery.

Retaliation Case Against School District on Track for Trial

By Saranac Hale Spencer |

The Philadelphia School District can't dodge a First Amendment case with qualified immunity, the Third Circuit has ruled.

Morgan Lewis Finalizes Bingham Deal, Adds 510 Lawyers

By Gina Passarella |

Philadelphia became home Monday to the largest firm in the United States based on domestic-attorney head count with the addition of 510 lawyers to Morgan, Lewis & Bockius.

Pepper Hamilton

Pepper Hamilton CEO Leaving the Firm

By Gina Passarella |

Scott Green, one of the first nonlawyer CEOs of an Am Law 100 or 200 firm, is leaving Pepper Hamilton to "pursue other interests," the firm said in a brief statement.

Robert Kerns

Kerns Sentenced to Two Years' Probation

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Robert Kerns, the former Montgomery County Republican Party leader and lawyer who was accused of rape, has been sentenced to two years' probation for indecent assault.

Judge Allows Explanation of UIM in Jury Instructions

By Lizzy McLellan |

In an underinsured motorist case, a Lackawanna County judge has decided that a jury should be told the plaintiff had UIM coverage, but should not know the insurer has already paid first-party benefits.

verdicts and settlements

Imprisoned Woman Awarded in Phila. Dungeon Case

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A mentally disabled woman who was imprisoned in Philadelphia basements for nearly a decade has won a $45 million verdict in the civil case against her captors.

verdicts and settlements

Truck Driver Wins Verdict After Serving Jail Time

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A truck driver who was accused of stealing gasoline from his employers and sent to jail for three months has won his malicious prosecution case against the Philadelphia food bank he worked for.

Lawyers, Not Clients, Must Pay Court Reporting Costs

By Gina Passarella |

A Philadelphia trial judge, in an issue of first impression, ruled lawyers, not clients, are responsible for paying court reporting costs.

Suzuki Not Liable in ATV Crash

By Max Mitchell |

Suzuki will not be held liable for an allegedly defective four-wheeled all-terrain vehicle that flipped onto and severely injured the 14-year-old driver, an Allegheny County jury has determined.

Traffic Court

Divided Pa. Supreme Court Lifts Ex-Judge's Suspension

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Over the protests of two state Supreme Court members, including the chief justice, the court has lifted the suspension of former Philadelphia Traffic Court Judge Michael J. Sullivan.