Regional News

FILE - In this June 5, 2013 file photo rescue personnel search the scene of a building collapse in downtown Philadelphia. The first wrongful-death lawsuit over the building collapse has been filed Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013 by the family of an art school graduate killed inside a Salvation Army store. The June collapse killed 24-year-old Mary Lea Simpson of Haverford and five others. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma, File)

Plaintiff in Salvation Army Case Awarded Record $95.6M in Arbitration

By Zack Needles |

More than three months after the Salvation Army building collapse civil case settled for a record $227 million, an arbitrator has allocated $95.6 million of that amount to plaintiff Mariya Plekan, a Ukrainian immigrant who had been shopping when the building collapsed.

Ice Miller Opens in Philadelphia With Panitch Schwarze Partners

By Lizzy McLellan |

Indianapolis-based Ice Miller has opened an office in Philadelphia, taking three lawyers from Panitch Schwarze Belisario & Nadel.

Teachers Fired Over Plans to Report Suspected Abuse Can Proceed With Claims

By Max Mitchell |

The Pennsylvania Superior Court has reinstated two wrongful termination cases brought by teachers alleging they were fired because they planned to report suspected child abuse or neglect to a state agency.

Judge Sends School Cop's Free Speech Lawsuit to Trial

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A school safety officer's First Amendment suit alleging he was fired because he spoke to a television reporter in relation to a story about a student accused of burglary must be decided by a jury, a federal judge has ruled.

Dentist's Age Bias Suit Against Penn Brushed Away

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A dentist claiming she was fired because of her age has lost her appeal seeking to reinstate her age discrimination case against Penn Dental Medicine.

City Hall in Philadelphia

Sprague, Abraham Seek to Revive Their Bid to Oust Williams

By Max Mitchell |

After their case seeking to oust Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams was tossed earlier this week, attorney Richard Sprague and former District Attorney Lynne Abraham have filed an appeal with the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

Benjamin Shein.

Phila. Asbestos Plaintiffs Firm Faces More RICO Claims

By Lizzy McLellan |

A Philadelphia law firm is facing renewed claims that it withheld evidence in asbestos cases.

City Hall in Center City, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Judicial Primary Results Mixed for Party-Endorsed, Bar-Recommended Candidates

By Max Mitchell |

On Tuesday, Philadelphians effectively chose the nine judicial candidates who will be taking seats on the Common Pleas and Municipal Court benches next year.

Wells Fargo

Phila. Sues Wells Fargo Over Alleged Discriminatory Lending

By Max Mitchell |

Philadelphia has sued Wells Fargo, alleging the bank violated the Fair Housing Act by targeting minority borrowers with high-risk and high-interest loans. The lawsuit is the first that a city has lodged against a financial institution since a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling established that municipalities have standing to sue banks over allegedly discriminatory lending practices.

Nurse Challenging Hospital's Vaccination Mandate Gets Second Shot

By Max Mitchell |

A federal judge has decided to cautiously allow a nurse with a chronic disease to proceed on claims that her former employer violated the Americans with Disabilities Act when it fired her for refusing to get vaccinated.

After Venue Musical Chairs, Auto Worker's Injury Suit Stays Put

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

After being kicked around to multiple courts, an auto worker's personal injury suit has finally found a home in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

Union Station, Washington, D.C.  May 13, 2015.  Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Judge's Decision to Override DA's Office in Amtrak Case a Rare Move

By Zack Needles and P.J. D'Annunzio |

A judge's order compelling the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office to bring ­involuntary manslaughter and reckless endangerment charges against the Amtrak engineer involved in the May 2015 derailment was highly uncommon, according to criminal defense lawyers and former prosecutors.

Philadelphia City Hall building.

It's Still Anyone's Game in Phila. DA, Judicial Races

By Max Mitchell |

The past few months have seen numerous unexpected twists and turns in both the Philadelphia District Attorney race and the race to fill numerous open seats on the Philadelphia courts—and primary day is shaping up to be just as unpredictable.

Mike Fitzpatrick.

Obermayer Adds Bucks Co. Office, Led by Ex-US Congressman

By Lizzy McLellan |

Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel has expanded further into the Philadelphia suburbs, opening an office in Bucks County.

Judge Rejects Bid to Throw Out $2.3M Dragonetti Verdict

By Max Mitchell |

The judge who oversaw a Dragonetti lawsuit that resulted in a $1.75 million award against a Philadelphia-area attorney has denied efforts by the defendants to overturn that verdict.

Civil Rights Lawyers: New Bill Harms Transparency in Excessive Force Cases

By Victoria Hudgins |

A bill passed in March by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives restricting the public identification of police officers involved in violent altercations would not affect the discovery phase of police brutality cases if signed into law, but could harm the public's trust in law enforcement, civil rights lawyers said.

Photo by TaxRebate.org.uk via Flickr.

Bucks MDJ to Stand Trial for Money Laundering

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A Bucks County magisterial district judge charged with laundering $400,000 with three other officials has been scheduled to stand trial.

Father's RICO Claims Against Daughter, Son-in-Law OK'd

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A civil Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act case filed by a man who claimed his daughter and son-in-law sabotaged his business by embezzling company funds and diverting them to their own business can move forward, a federal judge has ruled.

Charles Nebel, COO of Central Pa.-based McNees Wallace & Nurick.

McNees Hires New COO From Orrick's Back Office

By Lizzy McLellan |

McNees Wallace & Nurick has brought on a Big Law veteran to serve as the Pennsylvania firm's new chief operating officer.

Philadelphia City Hall, Handout

Counsel Fees, but No Williams, in Spotlight at Budget Hearings

By Max Mitchell |

Representatives from the First Judicial District appeared before the Philadelphia City Council on Wednesday to outline the district's fiscal year 2018 budget proposal, and the council members in attendance focused their questions on security, criminal justice reform efforts and payment issues with the court-appointed counsel fee unit.

Justices Agree to Eye Waiver of Risk in Drowned Triathlete Case

By Max Mitchell |

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has agreed to hear arguments over whether the widow of a man who drowned during the Philadelphia Triathlon can sue the event organizers, despite the decedent having signed a waiver assuming all the risks of participating in the event.

485 Pharmacies Sue Catamaran Successor Over Reimbursements

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A group of 485 independently owned pharmacies nationwide has sued OptumRx, the successor company to Catamaran Corp. through a merger, claiming they were low-balled on reimbursements based on outdated pricing data.

Expert Witness' Move to Aid Stricken Juror Leads to Risperdal Post-Trial Motion

By Max Mitchell |

Three weeks before the latest Risperdal case was tossed out midtrial, one of the jurors initially tasked with evaluating the claims collapsed while a plaintiff's expert was testifying on the stand.

Maureen Lally-Green, Duquesne Law

New Duquesne Dean Lally-Green Joins Wave of Women Law School Leaders

By Lizzy McLellan |

Duquesne University School of Law has named its first female dean, tapping interim dean Maureen Lally-Green to fill the role.

Defendants Fire Back at Raynor Over Civil Suit

By Max Mitchell |

Lawyers being sued for their involvement with the contempt proceedings against medical malpractice attorney Nancy Raynor are fighting back against her lawsuit, with some arguing state law does not recognize the claims and others seeking to have her case moved from court's standard program to one reserved for business disputes.

Bill Cosby

Court Rules Jury Can Hear Cosby's Quaaludes Testimony at Trial

By Lizzy McLellan |

A Montgomery County judge has ruled in Bill Cosby's criminal case that prosecutors may reference evidence from a 2005 civil deposition in which Cosby admitted to using Quaaludes to have sex with a woman. But other references to the civil case will be prohibited.

SEPTA bus in Philadelphia.

SEPTA Not Subject to Phila. Anti-Bias Law Protecting LGBT Persons, Justices Say

By Max Mitchell |

SEPTA is not subject to a Philadelphia ordinance forbidding discrimination based on sexual orientation, a divided state Supreme Court has ruled.

Pepper Hamilton

Judge Nixes Unfair Collection Claims Against Pepper Hamilton

By Lizzy McLellan |

Pepper Hamilton partner M. Kelly Tillery's use of his firm's letterhead for collection letters did not make him or the firm a debt collector under federal law, a federal judge ruled.

Phila. Judicial Ballots Quietly Trimmed, Stirring Confusion

By Max Mitchell |

When Philadelphia voters look at their ballots during the May 16 primary, they may find fewer open seats than they had expected in the judicial races, especially if they are following the number of endorsements from the Democratic City Committee.

Left to right: James Kwartnik, Jeffrey Mullen, Raymond Deluca and Bruce Ficken, Cozen O'Connor

Cozen O'Connor Grabs Construction Group From Pepper Hamilton

By Lizzy McLellan |

Cozen O'Connor has new leadership in its construction practice after bringing on a four-lawyer group from Pepper Hamilton.

Salary History Law Adds Hurdle to Law Firm Hiring

By Lizzy McLellan |

With the city poised to bar employers from asking about job applicants' salary history, Philadelphia's business community is preparing for guessing games. But legal recruiters in the city are sure of one thing—their jobs are about to be more challenging.

Joan Orie Melvin.

Orie Melvin’s Habeas Corpus Petition Denied

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A federal judge in Pittsburgh has denied former Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Joan Orie Melvin's habeas corpus petition.

Phila. Bar Taking Data-Driven Approach to Judicial Politics

By Max Mitchell |

The Philadelphia Bar Association's Judicial Commission takes about 2,000 hours vetting candidates seeking judgeships on the city's courts, so when a report came out saying that the product of those investigations—its ratings list of the candidates—had little impact when compared to ballot position or party endorsement, the bar leadership decided to do something about it.

Judge Dismisses Shingles Vaccine Lawsuit as Time-Barred

By Max Mitchell |

The first lawsuit filed in Pennsylvania over the shingles vaccine has been dismissed with a federal judge saying the suit was begun after the statute of limitations had run out.

Philadelphia.

Eight Phila. DA Candidates Fight to Distinguish Themselves

By Max Mitchell |

Throughout the Philadelphia District Attorney Candidates' Forum on Monday evening, the candidates continually sought to distinguish themselves in a race that is increasingly centered on two issues: public integrity and the expansion of diversionary programs.

Another Risperdal Case Tossed Midtrial

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The Philadelphia judge did not explain his decision, but another lawsuit was tossed in December shortly after the defense started their case.

Philadelphia.

As Wall Street Firms Soar, Do Pa. Firms Care?

By Lizzy McLellan |

Pennsylvania firms lagged behind the soaring heights New York City firms reached financially in 2016, but for leaders of those Keystone State firms, that's OK.

Phila. Lawyers, Ex-Pa. Justice Denied Tax Board Backpay

By Zack Needles |

A group of commissioners on Philadelphia's Board of Revision of Taxes, including former state Supreme Court Justice Russell M. Nigro, has lost in its bid to recoup nearly $300,000 in compensation lost as a result of a city ordinance that cut commissioners' pay but was ultimately declared unconstitutional.

Bill Cosby.

Pa. Justices Reject Appeal as Cosby Trial Approaches

By Lizzy McLellan |

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has declined to take up another appeal by Bill Cosby in his criminal case.

Bob Weishaar, McNees Wallace & Nurick partner

McNees Wallace Partner Takes Helm of Energy Bar

By Lizzy McLellan |

For the first time in more than a quarter-century, the president of the Energy Bar Association is from a Pennsylvania-based law firm.

Jury box..Photo by Jason Doiy.2-9-11.054-2011

Two Trials, Two Hung Juries, No Third Try for Feds in Gun Case

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Federal prosecutors in Western Pennsylvania tried and failed two times to get a conviction for a felon's possession of a gun, and now a federal judge is denying their request for a third bite at the apple.

'Audit Trail' Metadata Discoverable in Med Mal Suit

By Max Mitchell |

A woman suing a hospital over treatment that allegedly caused brain damage should be allowed to access "audit trail" information outlining which health care providers viewed her medical records and whether those records were manipulated, a Pennsylvania judge has ruled in an apparent case of first impression.

Pepper Hamilton

Ex-Baylor Football Director Drops Claims Over Pepper's Report

By Lizzy McLellan |

A former Baylor University football official is dropping his libel suit against the university and Pepper Hamilton, but his claims may not be gone forever.

Xarelto, a blood thinner drug. HANDOUT.

Xarelto Makers Want Plaintiffs' Litigation Funding Info

By Max Mitchell |

Defendant drug companies in the Xarelto mass tort want to know how the plaintiffs are funding their lawsuits.

Roberta Liebenberg of Fine, Kaplan & Black, and Dianne Nast, of Nast Law

EDPA Becomes Hub for Generic Drug Antitrust Litigation

By Max Mitchell |

A multidistrict antitrust litigation over the generic drugs Digoxin and Doxycycline has been significantly expanded to include numerous additional class action cases, all stemming from a wide-ranging federal probe that last year led two pharmaceutical executives to plead guilty to price-fixing charges.

Left to right: Linsey B. Bozzelli, Blank Rome and Marlee Myers, Morgan Lewis

Now at the Top, Pa. Women Dealmakers Look to Grow Ranks

By Lizzy McLellan |

More and more women are winning leadership roles at their firms in mergers and acquisitions and private equity. But plenty of obstacles to gender parity remain.

Uber sticker on a parked car on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. September 4, 2015. Photo by Diego M. Radzinschi/THE NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL.

Uber Facing Lawsuit Claiming Unidentified Driver Crashed

By Max Mitchell |

When Austin Lee stepped into a car he hailed through Uber, what he did not know was that the driver was not the one named in the app, a new lawsuit filed in Allegheny County against the rideshare giant alleges.

In Construction Shuffle, Lawyers Seek Small but Diverse Firms

By Lizzy McLellan |

Construction law specialists in Pennsylvania have been on the move in recent weeks, particularly among smaller firms. The lawyers gravitated to firms that weren't necessarily larger but that offered a different practice mix.

Kathleen Kane and Seth Williams.

How Seth Williams Became His Worst Enemy: Kathleen Kane

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The two rivals had a slew of similarities leading up to their political collapse amid criminal investigations.

Montgomery McCracken

Montgomery McCracken Adds Another NY Real Estate Group

By Lizzy McLellan |

Philadelphia-based Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhoads has brought on four attorneys and the full staff of a small New York firm, further growing its real estate practice in the Big Apple.

Mike McQueary, former assistant football coach at Penn State

McQueary's Attorneys Awarded $1.7M in Fees

By Max Mitchell |

The attorneys who represented Michael McQueary on claims that eventually won him $12 million against Penn State have been awarded roughly $1.7 million in attorney fees and costs.

Judge Tosses $4.2M Verdict Against Gas Driller for Water Pollution

By Max Mitchell |

Weak evidence and frequent out-of-bounds statements by plaintiffs' counsel were cited by a federal judge in Pennsylvania in vacating a more than $4.2 million verdict awarded to two families against a natural gas company that they alleged negligently polluted their water supply.

Can Opiate Litigation Ever Be the New Mass Tort?

By Max Mitchell |

Console & Hollawell attorney Richard Hollawell had a tough case to make when he stood before Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Frederica Massiah-Jackson in an effort to convince her that the maker of a powerful fentanyl painkiller should be held liable for his client's opiate-related death.

Philadelphia City Hall, Handout

FJD Can't Escape Class Action Over Civil Forfeiture

By Max Mitchell |

A federal judge has refused to let the First Judicial District out of a proposed class action over civil forfeiture procedures that plaintiffs say are unconstitutional.

Fraud Conviction in $23M Scheme Targeting Lawyers

By Lizzy McLellan |

A Canadian man accused of stealing more than $23 million from more than 100 lawyers, including some in Pennsylvania, has been convicted of conspiracy to commit mail fraud, wire fraud and money laundering in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania.

Judge Rejects Bid to Overturn $5M Sex Abuse Verdict

By Max Mitchell |

A Philadelphia judge has upheld a more than $5 million verdict over sex abuse against a foster care agency, rejecting a bid to have the verdict overturned due in part to post-verdict research of jurors that revealed two had possibly lied during voir dire.

Left to right: Barley Snyder managing partner Jeffrey Lobach and Stonesifer and Kelley partner Scott Kelley

Barley Snyder Acquires Hanover Firm, Plans Gettysburg Office

By Lizzy McLellan |

Central Pennsylvania-based Barley Snyder is merging with three-lawyer firm Stonesifer and Kelley effective April 1, the firms announced Thursday.

Seth Williams.

Shades of Fattah's Case in Williams' Legal (and Money) Troubles

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The Philadelphia district attorney's lawyer has asked to be excused due to Williams' financial woes.

US Hauled Back Into Warrantless Detainer Suit

By Max Mitchell |

One day after U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions warned so-called “sanctuary cities” to change their immigration policies or face funding cuts, a federal judge in Pennsylvania determined that the federal government should not be let out of a civil suit alleging that a U.S. citizen born in Mexico was wrongfully arrested pursuant to a warrantless immigration detainer request.

David Axelrod, Ballard Spahr.

Now at Ballard, SEC Vet Predicts Shift in Agency Approach

By Lizzy McLellan |

The SEC will remain committed to enforcement under Jay Clayton, says newly minted Ballard Spahr partner David Axelrod. But fines may be smaller.

Judge Slaps Down FLSA Certification for Gas Inspectors

By Max Mitchell |

A federal judge in Pennsylvania had some strong words for a proposed class of natural gas pipeline inspectors when he slapped down their bid for conditional certification in a decision that could be a big win for the oil and gas industry.

Schnader Harrison Grabs Former OAG Corruption Prosecutor

By Lizzy McLellan |

Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis has added to its white-collar and internal investigations practice, bringing on partner Laurel Brandstetter in Pittsburgh.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier walks to the Dauphin County Courthouse in Harrisburg, Pa., Friday, March 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Spanier Conviction a Likely Blow to Civil Suits Over Freeh Report

By Max Mitchell |

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier was acquitted of the two most serious charges he faced over allegations that he harbored serial child molester Jerry Sandusky, but the guilty verdict on a misdemeanor child endangerment charge will likely kill any chances of recovery in civil suits over fallout from the Sandusky scandal, according to attorneys.

Montgomery McCracken Loses Counsel Fee Scrap With Bankruptcy Client

By Zack Needles |

Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhoads will have to accept even less than what it claims it bargained for when it agreed to a fee reduction in a bankruptcy case, thanks to a federal judge's ruling.

Seth Williams.

Defense Bar Has Faith in DA's Office, Despite Williams Indictment

By Max Mitchell |

Philadelphia District Attorney R. Seth Williams is operating under a serious legal and ethical cloud, and by all accounts morale in the office may be at an all-time low. But criminal defense attorneys say they are not worried that the troubles at the top will cause any disruption when it comes to the day-to-day operations of line prosecutors in Philadelphia.

Platinum Company Scores $16M Against Junkyard

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The jury sided with Impala Platinum Holdings. However, it did not find officers and shareholders of A-1 Specialized Services liable for fraudulent transfer.

Suit Over Wal-Mart Ammo Sale to Remain in Philadelphia Court

By Max Mitchell |

The civil suit against Wal-Mart over claims that it negligently sold ammunition to a drunken 20-year-old, who later used it in a fatal shooting spree, will not be moved out of Philadelphia, a trial judge has ruled.

Acting U.S. Attorney William E. Fitzpatrick of New Jersey announces charges against Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams on March 21, 2017.

Feds Charge Phila. DA Seth Williams With Corruption

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

Federal authorities filed corruption charges Tuesday against Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams related to the acceptance of gifts valued at thousands of dollars to do favors for two local business owners.

Penn State University

Prosecution Previews Schultz, Curley Testimony in Spanier Openings

By Max Mitchell |

Two former Penn State administrators who reported to ex-university president Graham Spanier featured heavily in the prosecution’s opening statements as the criminal trial against Spanier got underway Tuesday.

Jury box..Photo by Jason Doiy.2-9-11.054-2011

York Jury Awards $4M to Man Blinded in Trip-and-Fall

By Max Mitchell |

A central Pennsylvania jury has awarded $4 million to a man who was partially blinded when he fell outside a shopping center.

Duane Morris Grows Revenue 4.6 Percent, PPP 4.4 Percent

By Lizzy McLellan |

Even with cost-conscious clients keeping industrywide demand in check, Duane Morris edged forward in 2016, hitting new highs for revenue and profits per equity partner.

Target Dealt $2.1M Verdict in Slip-and-Fall Case

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

An Allegheny County jury has awarded $2.1 million to a woman who tore her hamstring after slipping on a wet floor at a Target store.

Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane departs after her preliminary hearing Nov. 10, 2015, at the Montgomery County courthouse in Norristown.

Kane Urges Third Circuit to Affirm Dismissal of Retaliation Suit

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The former state attorney general argues that the plaintiffs failed to state a viable First Amendment claim, and that her alleged retaliation was entirely in the form of speech.

People participate in a peaceful demonstration against President Donald Trump's immigration policies at International Arrivals Hall inside Philadelphia International Airport, Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017.

Syrian Family Denied Entry in Phila. Still in Settlement Talks With Feds

By Victoria Hudgins |

A Syrian family that sued the federal government after being turned back from Philadelphia International Airport in the hours following President Donald Trump's first immigration executive order is in the midst of settlement talks with the U.S. Department of Justice.

Industry, Policy Groups Weigh In on Both Sides in Beverage Tax Appeal

By Max Mitchell |

As the challenge to Philadelphia's controversial tax on sweetened beverages makes its way through the appellate courts, numerous state and national interests are lining up behind each side in the issue.

Bill Cosby is escorted back to the courtroom at the Montgomery County courthouse Nov. 1 after a midafternoon recess where he will find out if testimony dating back 12 years and more will be admitted in the case against him.

Cosby to Get Allegheny County Jury

By Max Mitchell |

An Allegheny County jury will be brought across the state to hear the criminal case against comedian Bill Cosby, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court has ruled.

Saul Ewing Revenue Down 1.6 Percent, PPP Down 5.6 Percent

By Lizzy McLellan |

Revenue and profits suffered in 2016 as litigation activity slowed and two contingency fees came in later than expected.

road

Delco Jury Awards $5.4M to Brain-Damaged Cyclist

By Max Mitchell |

A Delaware County jury has awarded more than $5.4 million to a man who suffered brain damage after falling off his bicycle because of an alleged road defect.

fracking

Court to Mull Whether 1920s Deed Contemplated Fracking

By Zack Needles |

The Commonwealth Court has cleared the way for a suit over whether hydraulic fracturing is allowed under a land deed that was executed decades before the oil and gas extraction method was developed.

Blank Rome Boosts Revenue 22 Percent Amid Major Growth Spurt

By Lizzy McLellan |

Blank Rome hit the accelerator in 2016, posting big revenue gains as it added more than 100 lawyers from a failing firm and lured lateral hires from several competitors.

Civil RICO Case Against Carpenters Union Gets Green Light

By Zack Needles |

A federal judge in Pennsylvania has refused to toss out a civil racketeering suit in which members of a carpenters union are accused of committing "multiple violent and intimidating acts" after being barred from working at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

Charles Koch speaks in his office at Koch Industries in Wichita, Kansas.

Penn Law Is Latest to Receive Koch Foundation Donation

By Karen Sloan |

The school announced Tuesday that it has received $2.2 million to establish a new criminal justice research initiative.

Soft Demand Drags Pa. Law Firms Back Down to Earth

By Lizzy McLellan |

Big law firms based in Pennsylvania faced a reality check in 2016, as weak demand for legal services took its toll.

Philadelphia City Hall building at night

Phila. Mayor's Budget Proposes 5 Percent Hike for FJD, 2 Percent for DA

By Max Mitchell |

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney's proposed 2018 fiscal year budget includes a slight increase for the city's justice system.

Asbestos Case Beats Statute of Limitations

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A federal judge has denied a pump manufacturer’s argument that an asbestos-related lung cancer case should be tossed because it wasn’t filed in time.

Bill Cosby leaves the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa., Feb. 27, with spokesman Andrew Wyatt, after a judge granted change of venire in his criminal case.

Where in Pa. Is Bill Cosby's Impartial Jury?

By Lizzy McLellan |

There's no simple formula for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to choose the jury's home county, and finding impartial jurors anywhere in the state will be no easy feat.

Stay Requests in Mass Torts Place Spotlight on Upcoming SCOTUS Case on Jurisdiction

By Max Mitchell |

It's not unusual for attorneys to seek stays when a higher court is considering a key issue related to their case, but a small wave of these motions seen in consolidated actions across the country—all citing the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to take up a key jurisdictional issue—has struck some attorneys as unusual, and a sign of the potential significance the case holds.

penn state

Interlocutory Appeal Denied to Ex-PSU Officials in Abuse Case

By Max Mitchell |

Interlocutory appeals have been denied to three former Penn State administrators facing criminal charges in connection with Jerry Sandusky’s sexual abuse of children.

GlaxoSmithKline headquaters.

Judge Keeps California County's Avandia Suit in Federal MDL

By Max Mitchell |

A federal judge has rejected Santa Clara County, California's bid to have its case against GlaxoSmithKline over Avandia removed from the federal multidistrict litigation over the diabetes drug, but made way for an appellate court to immediately review the decision.

Bill Cosby

In Cosby Trial, Judge to Allow One of 13 Prior Accusers

By Lizzy McLellan |

In Bill Cosby’s criminal trial for alleged sexual assault, prosecutors will be allowed to present testimony from just one other accuser, aside from the alleged victim, the Montgomery County Court of Common Pleas has ruled.

A logo sign outside of facility occupied by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, in Somerville, New Jersey on May 31, 2015.

Janssen Wants More Medical Info From New Risperdal Plaintiffs

By Max Mitchell |

A dispute has arisen in the Risperdal litigation in Philadelphia over whether new plaintiffs in the mass tort should have to include prescription records and documentation of a Risperdal-related injury in their plaintiff fact sheets.

FJD to Curtail Cellphone Use in CJC—With Exemption for Lawyers

By Max Mitchell |

The First Judicial District is planning to use cellphone-locking technology at the Criminal Justice Center—although attorneys and court officials will be largely exempt from the new rules.

Justices to Consider Quantum Meruit in Nonpartner Fee Dispute

By Lizzy McLellan |

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court is giving Pittsburgh-based Meyer, Darragh, Buckler, Bebenek & Eck a second chance at recovering damages for attorney fees under quantum meruit, in a case where multiple justices acknowledged that court precedent had muddied the waters on what the firm could argue.

Judge Rules Invokana Litigation Should Remain in Federal Court

By Max Mitchell |

The litigation that began in state court over the diabetes drug Invokana should be handled in federal court, a district judge has ruled.

© Valeriy-Fotolia

Court Narrows Claims Over Essure Birth Control Device

By Max Mitchell |

A federal judge has shaved several theories from a cluster of cases against Bayer Corp. over its Essure birth control device, finding that express pre-emption applied to many of the plaintiffs' claims.

Philadelphia City Hall building at night

Phila. Taps Dechert, Eyes Hogan Lovells to Protect Sanctuary City Policy

By Max Mitchell |

As legal clashes over its status as a sanctuary city appear likely, Philadelphia is turning to a team of local big-law attorneys to advise it on how to handle the controversial immigration issue.

Pot Bar Takes Shape in Pa. as Cannabis Business Grows

By Lizzy McLellan |

As Pennsylvania takes stock of evolving legal issues surrounding marijuana and more law firms get involved, local bar associations are looking to provide guidance on the burgeoning but complicated area of law.

One-Time Kane Lawyer Must Face Extortion Lawsuit

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A federal judge ruled Amil Minora and his co-defendants must face allegations that they abused the legal process to extort a settlement from a businessman.

Pepper Hamilton

Amid Departures, Pepper Hamilton Revenue Drops 10 Percent, PPP Down 28 Percent

By Lizzy McLellan |

Firm leaders said double-digit declines were misleading, but there are signs that partners are unsettled.

Class Action Against Wyndham Hotels Over Cost Disclosure Survives

By Max Mitchell |

A federal judge has rejected efforts by international hotel chain Wyndham Hotels and Resorts to throw out a proposed class action lawsuit against it over claims that its website didn't tell customers the full cost of their reservations before booking.

Kevin Greenberg.

Greenberg Traurig Grabs Government, Corporate Partner From Flaster Greenberg

By Lizzy McLellan |

Government and corporate lawyer Kevin Greenberg has left Flaster Greenberg, taking his practice to 1,800-lawyer Greenberg Traurig.

Punitive Damages in Play in Suit Against Travel Stop Over Truck's Brake Fire

By Max Mitchell |

A federal judge said a jury should decide whether a nationwide travel center and auto repair shop should be hit with punitive damages for failing to properly fix a tractor-trailer before allowing it back on the road where the brakes later caught fire.